(Dana-Farber Cancer Institute) Despite an elevated risk of toxicity from chemotherapy, children with Down syndrome and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) did not experience higher rates of relapse or treatment-related mortality compared with other children treated on Dana-Farber Cancer Institute ALL Consortium Protocols.

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Pediatric Blood&Cancer, EarlyView.

Source: Pediatric Blood and CancerCategory: Cancer & Oncology Authors:

Breakthrough studies over the past decade have uncovered unique gene fusions implicated in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). The critical gene, cytokine receptor-like factor 2 (CRLF2), is rearranged in 5 –16% of B-ALL, comprising 50% of Philadelphia-like ALL and cooperates with genomic lesions in the Jak, Mapk and Ras signalling pathways. Children with Down Syndrome (DS) have a predisposition to developing CRLF2 rearranged-ALL which is observed in 60% of DS-ALL patients. These patients experience a poor survival outcome.

Source: Cancer LettersCategory: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Mini-review Source Type: research

Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is a prevalent form of pediatric cancer that accounts for 70-80% of all leukemias. Genome-based analysis, exome sequencing, transcriptomics and proteomics have provided insight into genetic classification of ALL and helped identify novel subtypes of the disease. B and T cell-based ALL are two well-characterized genomic subtypes, significantly marked by bone marrow disorders, along with mutations in trisomy 21 and T53. The other ALLs include Early T-cell precursor ALL, Philadelphia chromosome-like ALL, Down syndrome-associated ALL and Relapsed ALL.

Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is a prevalent form of pediatric cancer that accounts for 70 –80% of all leukemias. Genome-based analysis, exome sequencing, transcriptomics and proteomics have provided insight into genetic classification of ALL and helped identify novel subtypes of the disease. B and T cell-based ALL are two well-characterized genomic subtypes, significantly marked by bon e marrow disorders, along with mutations in trisomy 21 and T53. The other ALLs include Early T-cell precursor ALL, Philadelphia chromosome-like ALL, Down syndrome-associated ALL and Relapsed ALL.

Abstract
BackgroundTreatment of relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is particularly challenging due to the high treatment intensity needed to induce and sustain a second remission. To improve results, it is important to understand how treatment‐related toxicity impacts survival.
ProcedureIn this retrospective population‐based study, we described the causes of death and estimated the risk for treatment‐related mortality in patients with first relapse of childhood ALL in the Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology ALL‐92 and ALL‐2000 trials.
ResultsAmong the 483 patients who received…

Source: Pediatric Blood and CancerCategory: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

Conditions:   Down Syndrome;   Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia;   Childhood Cancer Interventions:   Drug: Daunorubicin;   Drug: Prednisolone;   Drug: Vincristine;   Drug: Epirubicin;   Drug: E-coli L-asparaginase;   Drug: 6-Mercaptopurine;   Drug: Methotrexate;   Drug: Hydrocortisone;   Drug: Cytarabine;   Drug: Cyclophosphamide Sponsor:   National Hospital Organization Nagoya Medical Center Not yet recruiting

Source: ClinicalTrials.govCategory: Research Source Type: clinical trials

We report here the successful use of blinatumomab, a bispecific T‐cell engager antibody construct, in a patient with DS BP‐ALL and persistent MRD at the end of consolidation. Blinatumomab has been shown to have excellent results in patients with relapsed/refractory BP‐ALL. This patient had no significant toxicity and achieved MRD negativity after only one cycle of blinatumomab.

Source: Pediatric Blood and CancerCategory: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: BRIEF REPORT Source Type: research

Conditions:   Down Syndrome;   Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia;   Childhood Cancer Interventions:   Drug: Daunorubicin;   Drug: Prednisolone;   Drug: Vincristine;   Drug: Epirubicin;   Drug: E-coli L-asparaginase;   Drug: 6-Mercaptopurine;   Drug: Methotrexate;   Drug: Hydrocortisone;   Drug: Cytarabine;   Drug: Cyclophosphamide Sponsor:   National Hospital Organization Nagoya Medical Center Not yet recruiting – verified September 2017

Source: ClinicalTrials.govCategory: Research Source Type: clinical trials

ConclusionsSerious infections in DS–ALL may present without typical signs such as fever. The immediate time period following administration of glucocorticoids is particularly associated with the risk of SIs.

Source: Pediatric Blood and CancerCategory: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Research Article Source Type: research

An 11-year-old boy with Down syndrome and acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed hepatic dysfunction after only 10 months of treatment. MRI revealed severe iron deposition in the liver, pancreas, and heart. In stark contrast to what is seen in hemoglobinopathies, pancreatic and cardiac iron overload occurred with relatively low transfusion exposure and in a very short time period in this patient. Although extensive experience managing iron overload in hemoglobinopathies informs our approach in other diseases, it is clear that factors not present in hemoglobinopathies may be operative in patients with malignancy undergoing …

Source: PEDIATRICSCategory: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Hematology/Oncology, Cancer/Neoplastic Case Report Source Type: research





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