I’ve struggled with weight all of my adult life. At times, I was sickly thin. Other times, I was bloated and uncomfortable in my own skin. Both experiences have given me a perspective on what it’s like to be overweight and underweight.
At my heaviest, I easily clear 260 pounds — I am close to that weight now. I am a 6’1” man, so my belly tends to enter a room before I do. At my thinnest, I was 160 pounds. At that weight I tended to look like I had a terminal disease. During my “lean years,” I could not lose enough weight. I felt horrible about myself when I was overweight, and felt embarrassed around other people. I still battle that internal voice.

I recently read a terrific article by Caroline J. Cederquist, M.D., in which she asked, “How can a man or a woman be accepting of their body when it falls so far outside of society’s vision of the ideal form?” I suppose that many of us who wrestle with our weight face that same question. Cederquist, who is a board-certified bariatric physician, insists that, “it is those who accept their weight and deal with it powerfully who achieve the most profound and lasting weight loss results.” So what does she recommend? Change your internal conversation. Here’s her advice:

1. Begin with the belief that you are far more as an individual than just your weight.
“Shift your internal conversation from one of shame and self-loathing to one of power and possibility begins with the belief that you are far more than just your weight.”

2. Answer the following questions: Who you are presently? Who you will become when you have powerfully dealt with your weight?
“Think of more than just weight loss, but of how you live your life. Maybe today you are ‘limited by your mobility’ but are creating a future of ‘activity and mobility.’ With this example, what does it look like when you are able to do the things that your lack of mobility has prevented? What new possibilities exist for you, and how is your experience of life different?”

3. Think of the action steps you will take to make the future you have envisioned for yourself a reality.
“Outline each step that you will take in becoming a lighter, healthier you. An action step is not, a statement such as ‘lose weight.’ An action step is a specific action that you will take in order to reach your desired outcome.”

For me, the takeaway from Cederquist’s advice was that perspective is everything. It’s akin to the pseudoscientific law of attraction: What you focus on and think about internally is what you’re likely to invite in life. True or not, I subscribe to that theory. Perhaps the first step to lasting weight loss is solely mental. Try envisioning a healthier, happier you for a day or two and see if your perspective changes. Remember, you can always lose weight. But you should never lose yourself to guilt or shame.

About Robard: Robard, a privately-owned, family-oriented company headquartered in central New Jersey, has been a respected leader in the weight loss and management business for more than 40 years. In that time, we have helped tens of thousands of physicians, hospitals, and medical professionals treat countless patients annually, ranging from mildly overweight to severely obese with related chronic conditions. To learn more, visit us online.

Source: Huffington Post

Blog written by Kevin Boyce/Robard Corporation





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