Castle Biosciences Inc. has announced the availability of a tumor tissue repository for patients whose tumors are being tested with the Company’s gene test for uveal, or ocular, melanoma. Patients will now have the option of storing an additional sample of their tumor free of charge for up to five years, and will be able to access it to take advantage of future developments in the disease. Castle Biosciences would provide the samples to third parties only with permission of the patient for legitimate research, treatment guidance or diagnostic purposes…

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Publication date: Available online 27 November 2018Source: Pharmacological ResearchAuthor(s): Fiona Augsburger, Csaba SzaboAbstractHydrogen sulfide (H2S), produced by various endogenous enzyme systems, serves various biological regulatory roles in mammalian cells in health and disease. Over recent years, a new concept emerged in the field of H2S biology, showing that various cancer cells upregulate their endogenous H2S production, and utilize this mediator in autocrine and paracrine manner to stimulate proliferation, bioenergetics and tumor angiogenesis. Initial work identified cystathionine-beta-synthase (CBS) in many tum…

Gallbladder cancer is a rare malignancy in most countries. The racial and sociodemographic factors associated with its incidence and survival are poorly defined. We aimed to investigate population-based gallbladder cancer incidence and survival trends on the basis of clinical characteristics and sociodemographic factors in the USA. Gallbladder cancer incidence and survival data from 2001 to 2012 were obtained from 18 registries of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. Incidence rates and Joinpoint trends were calculated by demographic subgroup. Survival trends were assessed using Cox proportional hazard…

The role of surveillance colonoscopy has long been established: it reduces both the incidence and the mortality of colorectal cancer. We aimed to assess the optimal colonoscopy surveillance interval period for the adenoma patients who underwent an adequate polypectomy at baseline colonoscopy to avoid overuse or underuse of colonoscopy. A retrospective study was carried out on the baseline adenoma patients who had had at least two completed colonoscopy examinations during the years 2000–2013 in the Digestive Endoscopy Center of the First Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University. All the patients had a complet…

The rates of colorectal cancer (CRC) interval surveyed in screen-detected patients using a fecal immunochemical test (FIT) are not negligible. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of interval cancer on outcomes compared with a population with cancer diagnosed after a positive test result. All patients between 50 and 71 years of age, who were residents of the Mantua district, affected by CRC and operated on from 2005 to 2010 were reviewed. Other than patient-related, disease-related, and treatment-related factors and tumor location, this population was differentiated as either participating or not to screening and…

International studies have shown a significant reduction in colorectal cancer (CRC) mortality following the implementation of organized screening programs, given a sufficient participation rate and adequate follow-up. The French national CRC screening program has been generalized since 2008 and targets 18 million men and women aged 50–74 years. Despite broad recommendations, the participation rate remains low (29.8%), questioning the efficiency of the program. A panel of experts was appointed by the French National Cancer Institute to critically examine the place of autonomy and efficiency in CRC screening and propos…

The objective was to assess cervical morbidity in Alsace before the human papillomavirus vaccinated population reaches the age of screening. Data on cervical lesions and cancers were collected by EVE for the period September 2008 to August 2011 from existing medical services and cytopathology laboratories in Alsace. Cytological and histological data were completed with data from the two cancer registries covering the region (Bas-Rhin and Haut-Rhin). Cancer incidence rates were computed for the target population (truncated to 25–64 years) and were age standardized according to the world reference population. World sta…

This study aims to investigate tar, nicotine and carbon monoxide (TNCO) yields of different filtered cigarettes in relation to BC risk. From the Bladder Cancer Prognosis Programme 575 non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) cases, 139 muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) cases and 130 BC-free controls with retrospective data on smoking behaviour and cigarette brand were identified. Independently measured TNCO yields of cigarettes sold in the UK were obtained through the UK Department of Health and merged with the Bladder Cancer Prognosis Programme dataset to estimate the daily intake of TNCO. BC risk increased by TNCO …

The aim of this analysis is to examine long-term trends in alcohol consumption and associations with lagged data on specific types of cancer mortality, and indicate policy implications. Data on per capita annual sales of pure alcohol; mortality for three alcohol-related cancers – larynx, esophageal, and lip, oral cavity, and pharynx; and per capita consumption of tobacco products were extracted at the country level. The Unobservable Components Model was used for this time-series analysis to examine the temporal association between alcohol consumption and cancer mortality, using lagged data, from 17 countries. Statist…

This study identifies a significant lack of knowledge among children aged 11–17 years at two London secondary schools and potentially identifies an area for improving our antismoking programmes. Although 80% of pupils cited lung cancer as being a smoking-related disease, very few other conditions could be recalled. We must do all we can to reduce smoking uptake in children. Understanding their baseline knowledge is the first step towards addressing the deficits in our current antismoking programmes.



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