About five days before my son was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, I knew something was wrong. He was urinating, drinking and eating a tremendous amount. He didn't drink a normal amount of water, like a couple of cups of water a day, he was drinking over 15 glasses of water in one day. Urinating alot, at least 7 times in one night. I knew in my mommy heart that something was not right. For some reason, the first thing I did was research the word diabetes on the internet. I knew he had diabetes. I didn't know anything about Type 1 (Juvenile) diabetes, or even that there was a Type 2 diabetes. I just knew that when I was teaching we were told to watch for kids that peed alot, because they may be developing diabetes. I'll get back to that load of misinformation that was laid on me, but in reality, that tidbit ultimately saved my son's life.

I have since learned that polyuria, excessive urination and polydipsia, excessive thirst are common first signs of Type 1 diabetes. The typically appear when the person's blood sugar remains above 180 for a length of time. It is the body's natural mechanism of trying to rid the body of excessive sugar in the blood stream

Fast forward to the hospital room when they told me my son had Type 1 diabetes. I wasn't in shock, because I was the person that diagnosed him. I told the pediatrician to do a urine check for sugar in his urine (I remembered those from when I was pregnant). But what did hit me like a ton of bricks was how the rest of the conversation continued.

I nodded my head at the nurse at her telling me of his diagnosis, then proceeded to ask, "Well where do we go from here, how do we cure him?" She smiled. She was a very compassionate woman to whom I will be forever grateful, and she said, "There is no cure. We will teach you how to give him shots to keep him alive."

This is about when I lost my mind. Alive?! No cure?! I am embarrassed to say this now, but I actually said to the nurse, "But we have insurance, what do you mean there is no cure?" She said, "There is no cure for anyone. It doesn't exist."

And that was it. That was the moment, that the perfect little love of my life, would need insulin shots and finger pricks to keep him alive. There was no cure. That was the day that I needed to prove that I could give my baby a shot...many shots, and check his sugar...many checks, and count every carbohydrate that he was going to eat, just so we could be released from the hospital. There was no cure. There is no cure. There is no way to grow out of this disease. That was it. The first day of the rest of our lives.

We don't live our lives waiting for a cure, but one sure would be nice.



Source by Leslie Guarino