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Overweight? Former smoker? You may qualify for a booster shot

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Overweight? Former smoker? You may qualify for a booster shot


at the conclusion of the meeting, the advisory committee had a robust discussion about whether boosters should be available for those at high risk of covid because of occupational or institutional risk. People like healthcare workers, teachers, frontline responders, essential workers and those in congregate settings. The result of their discussion was a close vote. Had I been in the room and on the committee I would have voted yes and that is reflected in my resulting decision to allow the use of Pfizer biontech, covid 19 booster dose for those 18 and older at high risk of covid 19 exposure and transmission because of occupational and institutional exposure. A. C. D. C. Director. It’s my job to recognize where our actions can have the greatest impact in a pandemic. We most often take steps with the intention to do the greatest good even in an uncertain environment and that is what I’m doing with these recommendations. I want to be clear we will not boost our way out of this pandemic infections among the unvaccinated, continue to fuel this pandemic, resulting in a rising number of cases. Hospitalizations and deaths where people are unvaccinated. The most vulnerable are those unvaccinated. If you are not vaccinated and eligible. I encourage you to get vaccinated to protect your community, your family and yourself

Overweight? Former smoker? Recently pregnant? You may qualify for a booster shot in Douglas County

Health care providers could decide to give booster shots to people 18-49 who are overweight or obese, current and former smokers, those who have substance use disorders like alcohol, opioid, or cocaine use disorders, and pregnant or recently pregnant women.

The Douglas County Health Department started giving out COVID-19 booster shots Tuesday — but it may surprise you who qualifies. While at first glance it appears those who are eligible are mostly long-term care residents and those 65 and older or people with underlying conditions, the list isn’t as strict as first suspected. Health care providers could decide to give booster shots to people 18-49 who are overweight or obese, current and former smokers, those who have substance use disorders like alcohol, opioid or cocaine use; and pregnant or recently pregnant women. Here is the list of booster eligibility as outlined by the Douglas County Health Department on Tuesday: Long-term care residentsPeople who are 65 and olderPeople who are 50-64 with any of the following underlying medical conditions: cancer, chronic kidney disease, chronic lung diseases (COPD, moderate to severe asthma, interstitial lung disease, damaged or scarred lung tissue, cystic fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, etc.), certain neurological conditions (dementia, Alzheimer’s, etc.), diabetes, Down syndrome, certain heart conditions (heart failure, coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathies, hypertension), HIV/AIDS, immunocompromised state, liver disease (cirrhosis, liver scarring, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, etc.), overweight and obesity, pregnancy and recently pregnant people (42 or more days after end of pregnancy), certain hemoglobin disorders (sickle cell disease, thalassemia, etc.), smoking (current or former), transplant (solid organ, blood stem cell, bone marrow), cerebrovascular disease (stroke, etc.), substance use disorders (alcohol, opioid, cocaine use disorders, etc.).For younger groups, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the following may receive a booster dose at least six months after completing the full Pfizer series “based on the individual’s benefits and risks.” You’re advised to talk to your healthcare provider to help you decide.People who are 18-49 with any of the same underlying conditions listed above.People who are 18-64 whose occupational or institutional settings increase their risk of transmission and exposure. Such occupations and settings include first responders (healthcare workers, firefighters, police, congregate care staff), education staff (teachers, support staff, daycare workers), food and agricultural workers, manufacturing workers, corrections workers, U.S. Postal workers, public transit workers, grocery store workers, and residents of homeless shelters or correctional facilities.Right now, booster shots are only approved for those who had the Pfizer vaccine. If you had the Moderna or Johnson & Johnson, also known as Janssen, vaccine, you’ll need to wait until further action is approved by the Food and Drug Administration and CDC for those booster shots.

The Douglas County Health Department started giving out COVID-19 booster shots Tuesday — but it may surprise you who qualifies.

While at first glance it appears those who are eligible are mostly long-term care residents and those 65 and older or people with underlying conditions, the list isn’t as strict as first suspected.

Health care providers could decide to give booster shots to people 18-49 who are overweight or obese, current and former smokers, those who have substance use disorders like alcohol, opioid or cocaine use; and pregnant or recently pregnant women.

Here is the list of booster eligibility as outlined by the Douglas County Health Department on Tuesday:

  • Long-term care residents
  • People who are 65 and older
  • People who are 50-64 with any of the following underlying medical conditions: cancer, chronic kidney disease, chronic lung diseases (COPD, moderate to severe asthma, interstitial lung disease, damaged or scarred lung tissue, cystic fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, etc.), certain neurological conditions (dementia, Alzheimer’s, etc.), diabetes, Down syndrome, certain heart conditions (heart failure, coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathies, hypertension), HIV/AIDS, immunocompromised state, liver disease (cirrhosis, liver scarring, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, etc.), overweight and obesity, pregnancy and recently pregnant people (42 or more days after end of pregnancy), certain hemoglobin disorders (sickle cell disease, thalassemia, etc.), smoking (current or former), transplant (solid organ, blood stem cell, bone marrow), cerebrovascular disease (stroke, etc.), substance use disorders (alcohol, opioid, cocaine use disorders, etc.).

For younger groups, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the following may receive a booster dose at least six months after completing the full Pfizer series “based on the individual’s benefits and risks.” You’re advised to talk to your healthcare provider to help you decide.

  • People who are 18-49 with any of the same underlying conditions listed above.
  • People who are 18-64 whose occupational or institutional settings increase their risk of transmission and exposure. Such occupations and settings include first responders (healthcare workers, firefighters, police, congregate care staff), education staff (teachers, support staff, daycare workers), food and agricultural workers, manufacturing workers, corrections workers, U.S. Postal workers, public transit workers, grocery store workers, and residents of homeless shelters or correctional facilities.

Right now, booster shots are only approved for those who had the Pfizer vaccine. If you had the Moderna or Johnson & Johnson, also known as Janssen, vaccine, you’ll need to wait until further action is approved by the Food and Drug Administration and CDC for those booster shots.



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